According to the report, TB kills 1.5 million every year and is the leading killer of people living with HIV/AIDS and a major cause of deaths due to anti-microbial resistance.

The latest report released by World Health Organisation (WHO) India accounted for 27 per cent of the total, followed by China with 9 per cent, Indonesia at 8 per cent, Pakistan (6 per cent) and Bangladesh (4 per cent).

Around 10 million people had TB in 2018. While 26,90,000 people had TB in India, out of which 19,90,000 were notified. According to the report, TB kills 1.5 million every year and is the leading killer of people living with HIV/AIDS and a major cause of deaths due to anti-microbial resistance.

India also had maximum number of drug resistant TB which is 27 per cent of a total 130,000 drug-resistant TB cases while China had 14 per cent such cases. Globally, 7 million new cases of TB were notified in 2018 — an increase from 6.4 million in 2017.


According to the WHO’s report, the number of people with TB in India is falling and that is good news,” said Dr Fujiwara. “This demonstrates that making serious gains against TB in a short time frame is possible even in the world’s largest and most geographically diverse countries if political leaders prioritise the disease. But let’s be honest — TB is not still not falling nearly fast enough in India, progress is still too slow to meet the targets – and if we don ´t end TB in India we can’t hope to end TB globally”.

The report also saw reduction in the total number of deaths. As per the report 1.5 million people died from TB in 2018, down from 1.6 million in 2017. “The number of new cases of TB has been declining steadily in recent years. However, the burden remains high among low-income and marginalized populations: around 10 million people developed TB in 2018,” said the report.

Even as the report says that 7 million people receive record levels of lifesaving TB treatment, a startling number of 3 million people still miss out. Today we mark the passing of the first milestone in the effort to reach people who’ve been missing out on services to prevent and treat TB,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General.

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