Pneumonia is generally treated with antibiotics such as moxifloxacin or levofloxacin, many of which have become ineffective as bacteria become resistant to the commonly prescribed treatments.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said on Monday that it had approved Nabriva Therapeutics Plc’s antibiotic Xenleta for treating patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

 
The drug, also called lefamulin, works by interfering with the bacteria’s ability to replicate and has been approved in both injectable (IV) and oral forms. 

The drug is also Nabriva’s first to be approved by the FDA and is expected to be launched in mid-September.

Although a number of patients reported side effects such as diarrhea and vomiting during the drug trial, the company said the effects were well within the range of other antibiotics taken orally.

Nabriva estimates about 5 million to 6 million Americans are diagnosed with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia every year, making it a leading cause of infectious deaths and hospitalization in the United States.

Pneumonia is generally treated with antibiotics such as moxifloxacin or levofloxacin, many of which have become ineffective as bacteria become resistant to the commonly prescribed treatments.


 




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